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Senior Citizen Jokes

By Janet Fickle

rockandroll_small_largeGeorge and Edith had been high school sweethearts 50 years ago, but had gone their separate ways after graduation. Then, two years ago, their paths crossed again, and they began seeing each other regularly. With age 70 just around the corner, they decided life was too short, and they might as well spend the rest of their lives together.  Excited about their decision to marry, they went for a stroll to discuss the wedding, and found themselves in front of a drugstore. George said, "Let’s go in. I have an idea."

Addressing the man behind the counter, George asked, "Are you the owner?" The pharmacist answered, "Yes sir, I am. How can I help you?"
George: "Do you sell heart medications?"
Pharmacist: "Of course."

George: "How about support hose?"
Pharmacist: "Definitely."

George: "What about medications for rheumatism, osteoporosis and arthritis?"
Pharmacist: "All kinds."

George: "How about waterproof furniture pads and Depends?"
Pharmacist: "Yes, sir."

George: "Hearing aids, denture supplies and reading glasses?"
Pharmacist: "Yes."

George: "What about eye drops, sleeping pills, Geritol, Preparation-H and Ex-Lax?"
Pharmacist: "Absolutely."

George: "You sell wheelchairs, walkers and canes?"
Pharmacist: "Yes, indeed. But why all these questions?"

George smiled, glanced shyly at Edith and replied, "We’ve decided to get
married and we’re considering you for our bridal registry."
Source: JokesQuote.Com

George and Edith are taking care of some of their special needs for their new life, but with new or second spouses at this age, there are usually two extended families involved.  It is so important to get every detail of your personal and financial planning taken care of immediately after marriage. Cooper, Adel & Associates are Certified Elder Law Attorneys who will be able to guide you and help you every step of the way with this important undertaking. Please call our 800-798-5297 to schedule a one hour free consultation in one of our four offices in Centerburg, Monroe, Sidney and/or Wilmington.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

CA&A Elder Law Tips & News

ElderLawTips-News73-300x968Be prepared for a disaster! According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, you should think ahead about what would happen if you have a flood or tornado. The article talks about a gentleman who kept his important papers in his bedroom in a water-proof safe. All was fine until a flood swept his home – and safe – away! So, here's a list of items you should consider keeping offsite is a safe-deposit box or other secure location: house deeds or rental leases, a list of insurance policies and the policy numbers, bank documents, birth and marriage certificates, passports, copies of drivers licenses, stock and bond certificates, powers of attorney and wills, as well as valuable jewelry. They also suggest that you keep digital copies of these documents and your family photos in the cloud using services like Dropbox or Google Drive. For more tips and ideas, read the article, Prepare Your House & Finances for a Natural Disaster or call our office for a review of your preparedness for this and other aging related disasters such as a healthcare crisis.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Do I place rental properties in my living trust, and, if so, how is the rent treated?

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Answer:  Yes.  It is important that you transfer your assets into the living trust including your rental properties.  The rental income is recorded on your tax return just as you have done before.  Depreciation expenses on your rental real estate will also be handled in the same manner as you did prior to creating your living trust.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Do I put recreational vehicles and boats into the living trust?

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Answer:  Yes.  It is essential that any titled items be transferred into your living trust in order to avoid probate.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Mason Veterans Memorial

By Attorney Dan Vu

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Just 9 miles from our Monroe Office, is a charming Veteran's memorial in beautiful Mason, Ohio. Located next to the Mason's municipal center, the memorial attracts local Veterans and families wishing to pay respect to those who served and to those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Ten large pillars serve as the main feature, each pillar represents the ten major conflicts in American history. This picture below is from my recent visit. It shows how each pillar is different in height. The height represents the amount of Americans who died in each conflict. Of course the pillars representing World War II and the Civil War were the two highest.

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It is hard to imagine now but as the stone engraving shows, not too long ago, over 16 million Americans served and over 400,000 Americans lost their lives to preserve our freedom.   

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The memorial also leaves a lasting impression with its eternal flame that pays respect to prisoners of war and the missing in action.

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If you are near Mason or our Monroe Office, take a trip to the memorial, it is a beautiful tribute to Veterans. If you would like to do more, the memorial raises funds by selling your name on a spot on the memorial's brick paving for only $50. A great gift idea for a Veteran you know would be to have their name engraved on a brick pavement at this beautiful memorial. It is something I will do soon myself for my wife's grandfather who served in Europe in World War II. For more information on purchasing a memorial brick, see: http://www.imaginemason.org/PDFs/VeteransMemorialBrochures.pdf

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“What does this ‘per stripes’ thing mean?”

By Attorney Keith Stevens

Screen Shot 2013-09-11 at 2.16.05 PMWhen I sit down for a review with a client, I am sometimes asked what “per stripes” means. These clients have looked at their documents for the first time in a while and do not understand the particular Latin phrase, “per stirpes”, that shows up around the names of their beneficiaries. This is a bit of a mispronunciation, but an understandable one, and gives us a chance to talk about contingent beneficiaries.

I recommend that clients name contingent beneficiaries in their wills and trusts. These are the people who would inherit from them in the event that the primary beneficiaries predecease my client. For instance, if Mom and Dad name Son & Daughter as their beneficiaries, what happens if Son dies before Mom and Dad?

The three most common methods for people to establish contingent beneficiaries, from my experience, are first per stirpes, second per capita, and third to surviving spouses. Let's break these down in turn:

  1. Per stirpes is a Latin term that literally means “by the stocks.” This allows the distribution to follow the beneficiary's blood line. So, if Son in my above example had children of his own, his share would continue to the next generation. There are two ways of determining how to distribute it to the next generation, but Ohio adheres to the traditional (and easier) version – if Son has biological or adopted children, they equally split his share.

  2. Per capita, meanwhile, means “by the head.” This is a winner/survivor takes all scenario. In my example above, if Son and Daughter are beneficiaries per capita and Son dies before Mom and Dad, his share goes to Daughter. In other words, naming beneficiaries per capita appoints a class of beneficiaries and the survivors split the inheritance.

  3. To the surviving spouse. My clients frequently ask me what happens to their daughter-in-law or son-in-law if their own child passes away and, while they may express some concern, they usually decide to let their child provide for the spouse. Most of my clients bypass a child's surviving spouse as a contingent beneficiary, but if they choose to use a surviving spouse as a contingent beneficiary then it is advisable to use language to ensure that they were still married to the primary beneficiary at his or her death.

Of course, in setting up your estate plan you can name specific individuals or organizations as your beneficiaries and contingent beneficiaries. It may be a topic for another blog post, but it is worth remembering that, with potential exceptions for spouses and minor children, no one is legally entitled to inherit from you if you do not name them as a beneficiary. This is fully under your control.

If you would like to discuss how you can arrange for your beneficiaries, please give us a call.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

September Designated Life Insurance Awareness Month

By Roy Whited

Screen Shot 2013-09-11 at 2.08.08 PMTaken in part from a news release from the Ohio Department of Insurance on September 3, 2013.

Governor Kasich and Lieutenant Governor Taylor encourage Ohioans to consider life insurance to protect family and loved ones. In this news release Governor Kasich and Lieutenant Governor and Insurance Director Mary Taylor are reminding Ohioans about the importance of taking steps to financially protect their loved ones if an unfortunate life event were to occur. They have designated September life insurance month in Ohio through a resolution. The release points out the importance of life insurance life-stage considerations. Including, young singles, young families, established families, seniors, single parents, military and raising grandchildren.

For Seniors, the release says. “Now is a good time to re-evaluate your life insurance to determine whether you still need as much coverage when you had a younger family and larger mortgage principle. If you are covered through your job and are planning to retire soon, inquire about converting it to an individual policy.”

For those raising grandchildren: It is generally not a good idea to leave a life insurance benefit directly to a minor child. Make sure the policy names a contingent beneficiary or a trustee who will act as a beneficiary on behalf of the child. Otherwise the life insurance benefit may not be accessible to the child until the issue is processed through court. You may want to set up a family trust with your selected trustee in charge.

The advice to seniors to re-evaluate their life insurance needs and the advise to those raising grandchildren is certainly good advice. However, why not take it one step further and have the insurance owned by a trust that can protect the insurance benefits and the cash value of the insurance from being lost to a long term nursing home stay.

Most people that I talk to are not aware that their cash value and death benefits can be lost to a nursing home spend down. Call Cooper, Adel & Associates today to schedule a free one hour consultation to learn how to use a trust to protect these benefits from being lost. 1-800-798-5297.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

If I place my home in the living trust, will it affect my mortgage? Can the mortgage company “call” my mortgage?

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Answer:  No.  Transferring your home into the living trust will have no effect on your mortgage.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Should I transfer my mortgage into the living trust?

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Answer:  No.  It is not necessary.  Your liabilities follow your assets.  You transfer your assets into the trust.  However, it is not necessary to transfer your liabilities into the trust.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Shedding Pounds after 50

By Janet Fickle

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Losing weight is a goal for many people regardless of age. Older adults who are overweight are at risk of damaging their overall health. After 50 years of age, muscle mass tends to dwindle while body fat begins to increase. Men and women willing to make some changes with their diet and exercise can lose weight.

Changing your diet in small ways, such as eating more low calorie foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains will start you on the path to losing those unwanted pounds. Changing your eating habits isn’t easy, but once you start eating healthy, the benefits will soon become apparent.

Of course not only should we eat more healthy foods and less of the unhealthy foods, we should begin some type of exercise routine. After consulting with your health professional about the type of exercise

that is appropriate for you, begin regular physical activity. This helps muscles grow stronger increasing the chance of preventing a number of ailments such as heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults need at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate -intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, every week. Muscle strengthening activities include lifting weight, working out with resistance bands, push-ups and sit-ups that use body weight for resistance and Yoga. Gardening is considered a muscle strengthening activity.

Some dietary changes and routine exercise is all it takes to shed weight after 50 and keep the weight off once it’s gone. Obviously it takes some effort on our part, but it can be done.

Take one day at a time and begin a regimen that will gradually give you the ability to shed those unwanted pounds and begin a healthier life.

Source: Mt. Vernon News – Wrinkles & Laugh Lines.

While protecting your health and well-being is one of the more important things you can do, protecting your financial well-being is also very important. Come in to the offices of Cooper, Adel & Associates for a free consultation regarding estate planning, avoiding probate, protecting your families finances. Call to schedule a free consultation at one of our four office locations in Centerburg, Monroe, Sidney or wilmington.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 



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