Category Archives: Veterans

VA Benefits for Desert Storm Veterans

by Attorney Ted Brown

Screen Shot 2014-01-15 at 9.11.00 AMThis week will mark the 23rd anniversary of the beginning of Operation Desert Storm on January 17, 1991. This marked the beginning of the Persian Gulf War and the subsequent liberation of Kuwait by coalition forces. Iraq, under the leadership of Saddam Hussein, invaded Kuwait in August of 1990 sparking global outrage. The United States, together with over 30 other nations, formed a multinational coalition to free Kuwait from Iraqi control.

Operation Desert Storm began with one of the most vigorous air campaigns in military history, spanning nearly 5 weeks of 24 hour-a-day operations including air-to-air dogfights with Iraqi aircraft and strategic and systematic strikes against Iraqi command and control sites on the ground. The air campaign was the first to use many of the state of the art precision guided weapons, stealth aircraft and other modern military technology still in use today. The air war was followed by the now famous “100-hour” ground invasion driving the Iraqi Army from Kuwait and entirely defeating what was then the 4th largest army in the world in just under 4 days. Offensive operations in the Persian Gulf concluded on February 28th, 1991.

Over 650,000 Americans served in the Persian Gulf War and the VA offers many benefits for those who served. Many Gulf War veterans are not aware of these benefits which include disability compensation, pension, education and training, health care, home loans, insurance, vocational rehabilitation and employment, and burial. (Click on any of these links for information directly from the VA website)

Additionally, there are a variety of illnesses and conditions that are linked to service in the Persian Gulf that can entitle veterans to special pension benefits.

See the link below for more details:

http://www.benefits.va.gov/persona/veteran-gulfwar.asp

(Image by Bryan Dorrough)

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

Qualifying for Veterans Benefits

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Attorney Mitch Adel was a guest on Fox 28 recently to talk about veterans benefits and how to qualify. For even more information on the qualifications, be sure to check out our veterans benefits page

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

Remembering our Cold War Veterans

By Attorney Ted Brown

Cold war veteransAs we celebrate Veteran's Day 2013, it is important that we take a moment to remember the men and women who defended our nation from the nearly 50 year struggle known as the Cold War. Stretching from the end of World War II in 1945 until 1992, simply stated, the Cold War was the global ideological struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union.

This struggle took many forms and existed on many fronts, including division of Berlin, the Space Race, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and global nuclear arms proliferation as well as the the so called “hot” conflicts of Korea and Vietnam.

The “soldiers” of the Cold War included not only traditional armed forces but also tens of thousands of unconventional military personnel tasked with maintaining a constant state of readiness including high-altitude aircrews, deep-sea submarine crews and land-based missile bases on alert 24 hours a day, as well as civilian personnel engaging in espionage, surveillance and clandestine missions, intercepting communications, other critical tasks.

One of these Cold War veterans was my Grandfather who served in the Air Force's Strategic Air Command. His squadron routinely flew 12 to 18 hour missions on fully armed B-47's and B-52's high over the Arctic Circle ready to attack strategic locations in Russia at a moment's notice.

He later commanded a nuclear missile base and supervised the routine drills to pressurize and fuel the missiles with highly-volatile liquid oxygen. In the event of war, this needed to be done in a matter of seconds and constant practice was required.

My Grandfather was one of many who served during this period who often go unrecognized for the perils and the unwavering stress they experienced while both preparing for and defending us from the constant threat of nuclear war.  

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

Veterans Day, 2013

By Attorney Dan Vu

 

Veterans Day For over 20 years, it has been our privilege to serve those who have served our country. With the clients we meet every day, we are reminded that many veterans and their widows who deserve benefits do not even know they are available. Instead, they struggle with red tape and delays as they try to work their way through the process of applying for benefits. That is why we are proud to work with veterans and their families to help them navigate through the VA benefits process and make sure that the steps they take to secure veterans benefits do not hurt their chances to obtain other government benefits.

 

We, at Cooper, Adel & Associates, will take a moment of silence on this Veterans Day to honor our veterans. We hope you will too.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

20th Anniversary of Black Hawk Down

By Senior Associate Attorney Ted Brown

Screen Shot 2013-09-30 at 10.53.33 AMThe story of the Battle of Mogadishu, depicted in the motion picture Black Hawk Down (2001) occurred on October 3rd, 1993 and this year will mark the 20 year anniversary of this critical, yet widely unknown, event in U.S. Military history.

Background:
The mission was part of a paramilitary and humanitarian relief operation undertaken by the UN and the United States to bring stability and end the tribal war that began in Somalia in 1992. This war was devastating to the people of Somalia and involved widespread starvation and ethnic cleansing with the death toll topping 300,000 by early 1993.

The United States had initially responded with a force of 20,000 U.S. Marines in the fall of 1992 but by August of 1993, that force had been reduced to just under 400 U.S. Army Special Operations soldiers including Army Rangers and the elite Delta Force.

The Battle:
These forces were tasked with carrying out surgical missions to capture and detain members of the hostile warlord Muhammed Far'h Aidid and his militia. One of these missions took place on the afternoon of October 3rd, 1993. Beginning at 3:45 PM, the raid soon went drastically wrong when an American Black Hawk helicopter was shot down and quickly surrounded by angry mobs of Somali Militia. Soon after, a second Black Hawk was shot down.

American forces quickly regrouped to respond to the crash sites which were several miles apart separated by a dense and hostile urban landscape. Only two of eight total crew members survived the initial impact. These survivors single-handedly defended large groups of enemy forces with only small arms until American forces could reach them. Each crash site became the scene of a major and prolonged firefight that lasted into the early morning of October 4th.

American forces worked through the night to recover the bodies of the fallen Americans, in an effort to uphold the Ranger creed “leave no man behind.” These efforts were also motivated by previous incident where an angry Somali mob had burned and dragged bodies of American solders through the streets. Crews spent hours cutting through the armor plated cockpits to extricate the pilots trapped in the wreckage, the whole time under heavy fire. By morning, 19 Americans had been killed. A few weeks later, all American forces were withdrawn from Somalia.

Connection to al Qaeda
However, the event carries historical significance far beyond the borders of Somalia. In 1993, the Somali Militia began working with Muhammed Atef, the operational commander of al Qaeda, then a relatively unknown organization. Atef and others provided the Somalis training and assistance in defeating the technologically dominant American forces. Atef's strategy was to shoot down American helicopters and force them to fight in the streets. When this strategy proved to be overwhelmingly successful in bringing about an unequivocal American retreat, it lent untold creditability and fame upon the leader of al Qaeda, Osama bin Laden.

Muhammed Atef was later killed by American forces fighting in Afghanistan. American weapons and equipment traced to soldiers killed in Somalia in 1993 has also been found on Taliban and al Qaeda fighters in Afghanistan.  

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Mason Veterans Memorial

By Attorney Dan Vu

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Just 9 miles from our Monroe Office, is a charming Veteran's memorial in beautiful Mason, Ohio. Located next to the Mason's municipal center, the memorial attracts local Veterans and families wishing to pay respect to those who served and to those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Ten large pillars serve as the main feature, each pillar represents the ten major conflicts in American history. This picture below is from my recent visit. It shows how each pillar is different in height. The height represents the amount of Americans who died in each conflict. Of course the pillars representing World War II and the Civil War were the two highest.

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It is hard to imagine now but as the stone engraving shows, not too long ago, over 16 million Americans served and over 400,000 Americans lost their lives to preserve our freedom.   

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The memorial also leaves a lasting impression with its eternal flame that pays respect to prisoners of war and the missing in action.

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If you are near Mason or our Monroe Office, take a trip to the memorial, it is a beautiful tribute to Veterans. If you would like to do more, the memorial raises funds by selling your name on a spot on the memorial's brick paving for only $50. A great gift idea for a Veteran you know would be to have their name engraved on a brick pavement at this beautiful memorial. It is something I will do soon myself for my wife's grandfather who served in Europe in World War II. For more information on purchasing a memorial brick, see: http://www.imaginemason.org/PDFs/VeteransMemorialBrochures.pdf

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August 10, 1961, The Beginning of a Tragic Legacy

By Steven Wright

Honoring our vetsIt is well known that during the Vietnam War, the United States sprayed defoliants from aircraft to destroy foliage and crops in order to deprive the enemy of valuable cover and food supply. The chemical used to accomplish the defoliation was Dioxin, a deadly chemical known to cause cancer and other horrible diseases; but most of us know Dioxin by the name Agent Orange.

The first official use of Agent Orange in Vietnam occurred on August 10, 1961, thus marking the beginning of many problems to come. Official US casualty reports from the Vietnam War indicate that 58,220 US Service members were killed from direct action during the war. This number is inaccurate and should be changed to reflect the realities and legacy of our use of Agent Orange.

During the war and shortly after the war, hundreds of thousands of US service members who served in Vietnam, off the coast of Vietnam, and at various US bases throughout the Pacific who had directly or indirectly come into contact with this devastating chemical have developed or died from cancers and other debilitating diseases.

It is important that we acknowledge August 10, 1961, not as a day to celebrate, but as a day to stand up in support of our Vietnam Era war veterans and support them in their fight for acknowledgement. That’s why Cooper, Adel & Associates has taken steps to educate and certify their attorneys and staff on these matters and invite you to contact our office should you wish to learn more.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Apply For VA Pension Now

By Steven Wright

Screen Shot 2013-07-15 at 10.51.56 AMThe Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a pension program designed to help veterans and their surviving spouses with the high costs of care that many seniors face. To qualify for this pension, you generally need to be over the age of 65, meet VA’s medical requirements, and meet certain asset and income limitations.

Generally, the income limitation requires that the person applying for the pension have zero, or next to zero income. Since most veterans or their surviving spouses have income, the VA allows a veteran to reduce their countable income by deducting unreimbursed medical expenses. Unreimbursed medical expenses are medical expenses paid out-of-pocket by the veteran or their surviving spouse and not reimbursed by someone else. These medical unreimbursed medical expenses are medical insurance premiums, nursing home costs, assisted living costs, and in-home care costs.

In many cases many veterans or their surviving spouses meet all of these requirements, but they do not yet have the necessary medical expenses to reduce their income to qualifying levels. As a result, many veterans wait until they are already in a nursing home or assisted living facility before applying. This can be detrimental because in many cases, the pension takes approximately 8 to 10 months to be approved. This is a long time gap for any claimant who desperately needs this assistance.

However, veterans and their surviving spouses should not wait until there is already a nursing home or assisted living cost involved because the VA does recognize costs associated with in-home care. Applying while the veteran is still at home saves substantial time, money, and stress. That is because in-home caregivers are often less expensive, and can be hired only for the times that the veteran needs the help.

In addition, many family members already take care of the veteran or surviving spouse in their home. If this is the case, then an Ohio elder law attorney can help get the VA pension coming into the home now by creating a contract of care between the veteran and the helper. This contract of care creates a sufficient unreimbursed medical expense for VA purposes. At Cooper, Adel & Associates, we have a staff that has helped many veterans and their surviving spouses successfully make a claim for VA Pension while still in their own homes by helping them create a caregiver arrangement. Contact our offices for more information on VA Pension and general estate planning needs.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

HONORING OUR VETS: Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

Honoring our vets

By Steven Wright

Screen Shot 2013-07-29 at 12.48.31 PMOn July 30, 1945 the USS Indianapolis was sunk by the Imperial Japanese submarine I-58. This denotes not only the last major US ship lost during World War II, but also the single largest loss of life at sea in US History.

When the ship went down, only 300 crewman out of 1,196 on board went down with the ship. Unfortunately, the remaining sailors floated at sea for several days before any rescue attempt even began. During this time many of these men died from drowning, dehydration, and shark attacks. Once the Navy began rescue operations, they were only able to rescue 316 sailors from the USS Indianapolis.

To find out more about this amazing story, visit USS Indianapolis

We commend those who served.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

The Doolittle Raiders Hold their Final Reunion

By Attorney Dan Vu

71st logoLast April, with only four living Doolittle Raiders still living, the men decided to hold their final reunion at Fort Walton Beach, Florida. They chose this location since it was where their famous mission began. The Doolittle Raiders trained at Fort Walton Beach to take off in B-25 Bombers on short practice runways of less than 500 feet. They would need this training to take off from the flight deck of their aircraft carrier, the USS Hornet.

The daring mission was to bomb Japan itself at a time when our country was in its darkest hours, reeling from the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor. Also, the United States continued to suffer losses in the Philippines. The raid was a strategic success, since it required Japan to re-allocate its resources to defend its homeland and it also gave the the United States a much need morale boost.

Of the 80 men who took part in the mission, 69 survived the mission and 62 survived the war. Today four are living and three of the four were healthy enough to make the reunion.

In 2010 the Doolittle Raiders held their reunion at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base and Museum Center near Dayton, Ohio. For those of you local to our Monroe and Sidney Office, I encourage you to go see the Wright Patterson Air Force Museum to learn more about the raiders and to see in person some of their memorabilia.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 



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