Category Archives: Elder Law Tips & News

Scam Alert: Bogus Funeral Notifications

By Carmen Potterton

Screen Shot 2014-04-08 at 11.55.47 AMIt seems that every time you turn on the news, there is yet another scam being reported and unfortunately, many of them tend to target senior citizens.

Senior Planet recently posted a scam alert concerning funeral notifications. An email is sent that is supposedly a notification that a friend has died. In order to get the details, you have to click on the link provided and once you do, the scammers infect your computer with malware. Malware generates viruses and spyware that allows the scammers access to your computer.

What you can do to avoid the scam:

  • If you get an email with the subject line “Funeral notification,” put it straight in the trash. Contact the funeral home or the family if you’re concerned the email might be for real.

  • If you get any email from someone you don’t personally know that has a link in it, do not click on the link.

  • Call or write the person or business who sent the email – or supposedly sent it – and get the information from them directly. If it’s a business, you can use Google to track down contact information.

  • Same goes for an email from someone you do know that sounds a little fishy. Call before you click!

http://seniorplanet.org/another-scam-alert-funeral-notifications/

 

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

How often should you check your credit card purchases?

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According to a recent Mint article, you should be looking at your purchases at least every two weeks! Why?

  • Banks tolerate credit card fraud – they say it's too expensive to be 100% sure. Meanwhile, we all pay for fraud – and it can happen on our credit card.

  • You only have 60 days to dispute a purchase. If you are not checking your purchases until you get the bill at the end of the month (or, like most people, even less often than that!), you might easily miss the 60 days.

  • If you don't know it's coming, you can't budget for it – that's what can happen with fraudulent charges if you are not checking. That is, you will just be charged.

    The One Big Mistake Every Consumer Makes

 

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

CA&A Elder Law Tips & News

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Living in two states – what is your residence?

According to former NAELA president, attorney Craig Reaves, you have only one legal residence or domicile. It does not matter, as you might think, how much time you spend in one location or the other. Rather, your residence is normally determine by the following questions:

  • Where are you registered to vote?

  • Where was your drivers' license issued?

  • Which state do you list on your tax returns?

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

CA&A Elder Law Tips & News

ElderLawTips-News73-300x968Be prepared for a disaster! According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, you should think ahead about what would happen if you have a flood or tornado. The article talks about a gentleman who kept his important papers in his bedroom in a water-proof safe. All was fine until a flood swept his home – and safe – away! So, here's a list of items you should consider keeping offsite is a safe-deposit box or other secure location: house deeds or rental leases, a list of insurance policies and the policy numbers, bank documents, birth and marriage certificates, passports, copies of drivers licenses, stock and bond certificates, powers of attorney and wills, as well as valuable jewelry. They also suggest that you keep digital copies of these documents and your family photos in the cloud using services like Dropbox or Google Drive. For more tips and ideas, read the article, Prepare Your House & Finances for a Natural Disaster or call our office for a review of your preparedness for this and other aging related disasters such as a healthcare crisis.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

CA&A Elder Law Tips & News

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Boomers – they’re calling us Senior Boomers now. 1 in 8 Americans (that 13% or 40.3 million) are 65 or older and all the Boomers will reach 65 by 2030. Here are some sobering statistics from America’s Health Rankings, close to:

  • 80% of seniors live with at least one chronic health condition

  • 50% of seniors have two or more chronic conditions

  • 25% are obese

  • 20% have diabetes

  • 70% have heart disease

  • 60% have arthritis

What does this mean for you if you are a Senior Boomer, or soon-to-be Senior Boomer, or the child of a Senior Boomer? It’s time to get your boomer in action to take steps that will protect their assets in the event of a catastrophic illness. It’s all well and good to think that diet and activity will “make it better”, but the sad truth is that these conditions can leave you and your family with a bill you can’t pay. Planning ahead means that you have options and the possibility to save all you’ve worked a lifetime to earn.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

CA&A Elder Law Tips & News

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More than 15 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with dementias including Alzheimers. According to the 2013 Alzheimer’s report, these unpaid caregivers are primarily immediate family members. Only 20% of these individuals have paid care in the community. These faithful caregivers saved the nation over $216 billion in 2012 – that’s over half the net value of Wal-Mart sales and more than eight times the total sales for McDonald’s. Who are these caregivers?

62% are women

23% are age 65 or older

50% have some college education

70% were married or in a long term relationship

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Too old to donate your organs?

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In our office, we routinely discuss organ donation with our clients. Whether you want to donate your organs or not, it is important to let your family know your wishes before it is too late. Over 100,000 people in the US are waiting for an organ donation, according to the Mayo Clinic, and many will die for lack of a donor. A single organ donor can help save or improve the lives of 50 people. The decision to use organs or not is made strictly on medical criteria. Further, very few medical conditions automatically disqualify a donor.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

If you were in an accident, who would know?

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It takes an average of SIX HOURS for emergency personnel to locate your family if your contacts are not registered with the BMV. In Ohio, we are lucky to have a website where you can make emergency contact information available and cut emergency contact time from hours to minutes. If something happens to you, and none of your loved ones are with you, local police or emergency personnel can reach your emergency contacts to inform them or, if they have the authority and you can’t, to make decisions for you. It would be a good idea to add your emergency contacts – and your children’s – in the registry. It is simple and secure. Here is the link: Ohio BMV Emergency Contacts

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Be Estate-Ready for Summer Trips

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Make sure your affairs are in order if you are planning a summer trip. Here are some items to consider:

  • If you don’t have a plan for where your assets will go at your death, it would be good to set one up ASAP! If that plane does go down, you don’t want Ohio’s version of Uncle Sam to say where your assets will go.

  • If you have an estate plan, this is a good time to meet with an elder law attorney to make sure it’s up to date. Life events, such as death, marriage, re-marriage and divorce can change how your plan should work. Also, don’t underestimate the impact of changes to the law.

  • Make sure you have healthcare directives with the appropriate HIPAA provisions so that your family can make decisions for you if you can not. You will want the doctors to speak with them and look allow them to review your records. Call your elder law attorney for a review. Carry your healthcare directives with you on the trip so that if there is an accident, they are available. You may want to put them on your key chain on a labeled thumb drive.

  • Make sure your papers are organized and that your appointed person knows where to find your trusts, legal documents, insurance policies, bank account information, etc. Don’t forget to think about your “digital” assets as well – passwords and usernames can be unaccessible to those who need them if you are suddenly incapacitated or pass away.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Elder Law Tips & News

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Don’t take chances with your retirement assets! Most of us are not thinking about dying when we start a new job and sign up for a 401K or IRA. The problem is, your lack of concentration can come back to haunt your heirs. What can you do about it? Review your elections on your retirement plans now – your elder law attorney can help. Here are a few questions to consider:

  • Have you had any major changes in your family – divorce, death and remarriage are times when you need to revisit your elections.

  • Who is your beneficiary? Some employer plans have default language that may undercut your wishes and bypass those your want to receive the benefits of your plan earnings.

  • Did you specify a contingent beneficiary? You should have a secondary beneficiary or beneficiaries if you first choice is deceased.

  • Make sure your plan beneficiary is NOT your estate. If it is, that could mean that your family will have end up with the delays and costs of probate and suffer negative tax consequences.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 



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