Category Archives: Aging

Scam Alert: Bogus Funeral Notifications

By Carmen Potterton

Screen Shot 2014-04-08 at 11.55.47 AMIt seems that every time you turn on the news, there is yet another scam being reported and unfortunately, many of them tend to target senior citizens.

Senior Planet recently posted a scam alert concerning funeral notifications. An email is sent that is supposedly a notification that a friend has died. In order to get the details, you have to click on the link provided and once you do, the scammers infect your computer with malware. Malware generates viruses and spyware that allows the scammers access to your computer.

What you can do to avoid the scam:

  • If you get an email with the subject line “Funeral notification,” put it straight in the trash. Contact the funeral home or the family if you’re concerned the email might be for real.

  • If you get any email from someone you don’t personally know that has a link in it, do not click on the link.

  • Call or write the person or business who sent the email – or supposedly sent it – and get the information from them directly. If it’s a business, you can use Google to track down contact information.

  • Same goes for an email from someone you do know that sounds a little fishy. Call before you click!

http://seniorplanet.org/another-scam-alert-funeral-notifications/

 

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

Are you aging well?

This infographic outlines a number of important factors that impact our ability to age well, including personal capacity to react to life’s transitions, individual behaviors and health status, societal factors, and the individual’s ability to engage with their community and remain independent. More information is available at http://www.philips-thecenter.org/aging-well

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

How to communicate with an older person who has a hearing loss

By Carmen Potterton

Screen Shot 2014-03-03 at 12.15.26 PMAccording to NIDCD, about one in three people between 65 and 74 has a hearing loss and 47% of those over 75 have a hearing problem. The ability to communicate clearly with others in and of itself can be difficult but when the person you are trying to communicate with has a hearing loss, it becomes even more so.

Have you ever heard “I can hear you but I can't understand you”? The problem is that age-related hearing loss often affects the structure of the inner ear or cochlea and/or the auditory pathways to the brain. This type of hearing problem may not be a volume problem – speaking louder may not help. For these folks, hearing aids only make matters worse, particularly if there is background noise.

Here are a few tips:

  • Face the person while you speak. Visual queues and expressions help them understand what you are trying to say.

  • Speak slowly and distinctly (not necessarily louder).

  • If the person indicates that they can't understand, try to rephrase what you are saying. Repeating is usually not as helpful.

  • Try to find a quiet and well-lit place to talk.

  • If all else fails, you can write or draw on paper.

If you have a hearing loss and you or a family member is in crisis or should do some estate planning, it's a good idea to find an elder law attorney. An experienced elder law attorney deals with seniors who have hearing loss all the time. An experienced elder law attorney knows how to communicate your options so that you can determine the best plan for you and your family.

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/pages/older.aspx

What are Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s) and why do they matter?

By Michelle Mason

Screen Shot 2014-01-28 at 8.37.57 AMThe activities of daily living are basic tasks of everyday life. This is a term that is used in healthcare to refer to daily self-care activities within an individual's place of residence or in an outdoor environment. Many programs use ADLs to determine not only the functional abilities but also the level of care and the benefits available to the individual.

Assessing a senior's functional abilities helps the family and medical professionals determine a person's current care needs. Assessments can be valuable, by showing patterns of either progress or decline.

Whether the senior is able to perform all of the activities of daily living independently, or if they need help with just a few of them, the assessment will help the professional team create a care plan to meet each individual's needs.

Activities of Daily Living (ADL's)

Most senior healthcare providers group the activities of daily living into the following categories:

Bathing and showering: being able to bathe or shower with no assistance.

Personal grooming: Shaving, brushing teeth and coming hair.

Dressing: choosing appropriate garments and being able to dress and undress, having no trouble with buttons or zippers.

Preparing meals and eating: making appropriate food choices and preparing meals safely. Being able to feed their self.

Organizing and taking medications: taking the appropriate medications and correct dosages on time.

Mobility/Transferring: being able to walk or being able to transfer oneself from the bed to the wheelchair and back with no assistance.

Toileting: using the restroom independently

Maintaining the home: doing housekeeping and laundry or making arrangements for the housekeeping and laundry to be done.

Managing finances: budgeting or paying rent and utility bills on time, etc.

Using transportation: being able to drive or use public transportation for appointments, shopping etc.

Shopping: being able to shop for groceries and other small necessities, and transport purchases from store to home.

If you have a loved one who is age 60 or older and needs help with 2 or more of the Activities of Daily Living, our firm may be able to help you apply for a program called Passport Waiver, which offers in home healthcare. Passport Waiver is an alternative program to help keep older adults safely and independently in their homes with quality services. Please call for an appointment to find out more.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

What matters most to U.S. seniors

The United States of Aging Survey, conducted by the National Council on Aging (NCOA), UnitedHealthcare and USA TODAY, explores what underlies American seniors’ perspectives on aging, and how the country can better prepare for a booming senior population.

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Screen Shot 2014-01-24 at 8.57.04 AMWhat matters most to you?  It takes planning to protect your wealth.  It takes planning to assure that your wealth is not adversely affected if you have a catastrophic health condition or require long term care at home or in a nursing home.  See your elder law attorney to help you put a plan in place for you and your family.  It’s a small price to pay for peace of mind.

 

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

What was your world like in 1964 – Could you imagine how it would look today?

By Kathy Cooper

Screen Shot 2014-01-14 at 2.25.48 PMIn college, I loved science fiction and one of my favorite authors was Arthur C. Clark – Childhood's End, 2001 a Space Odyssey, and many more. He is and was a visionary. In 1964, Sir Arthur C. Clarke predicted how we would communicate and work with one another in the year 2000:

We could be in instant contact with each other, wherever we may be, where we can contact our friends anywhere on earth, even if we don’t know their actual physical location. It will be possible in that age, perhaps only 50 years from now, for a man to conduct his business from Tahiti or Bali just as well as he could from London…. Almost any executive skill, any administrative skill, even any physical skill, could be made independent of distance. I am perfectly serious when I suggest that one day we may have brain surgeons in Edinburgh operating on patients in New Zealand”

We still had dial phones in 1964 (every young girl wanted a princess phone then)– and there were no cordless or cellular phones. The first cellular phone was introduced in 1973 but not commercially available until 1983. Today, as Clarke suggested, we are always in touch no matter where we are, no cords required.

Interestingly, doctors began virtual surgery in 2001 and it is pretty popular today, particularly considering the advances in robotic surgery. Clarke got that right.

Thomas Friedman wrote a ground-breaking book in 2005 that talked about the ability of businesses to operate globally in a “flat” world, very much as Clarke predicted.

Are you as visionary as Sir Clarke? Do you know how your future will look and are you prepared for it? It's worth thinking about as we begin a new year.

http://www.openculture.com/2011/09/arthur_c_clarke_looks_into_the_future_1964.html

Credit for picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorola_DynaTAC

 

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

Who is turning 65 in December?!

December 3 … Ozzy Osborn – the Godfather of Heavy Metal

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December 13 … Ted Nugent, guitarist and singer 

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December 21 -Samuel Jackson, actor, Die Hard with a Vengeance, Patriot Games

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December 25 – Barbara Mandrell, country music singer, I was Country When Country Wasn’t Cool

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Winter Safety Awareness Week with tips to prevent falls in wintry conditions

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COLUMBUS - Many parts of Ohio have already gotten a sneak peek at winter this year with early snow accumulations, cold temperatures and icy conditions. November 17-23 is Winter Safety Awareness Week in Ohio. One of the biggest risks from wintry weather is falling, particularly among older adults. Icy conditions make it harder to stay on your feet, and the cold may cause us to limit our activity, which can lead to loss of strength and balance.

To help you prevent falls this winter, STEADY U Ohio, the state's new falls prevention initiative, offers these tips:

  • Don't let winter send you slipping and trippingBundle up to stay warm but make sure you can see in all directions and move easily and freely.
     
  • Wear sturdy shoes or boots with treads, even if you're just going out to get the newspaper. (Submitted by Cindy Hintz, via Facebook)
     
  • Do some light stretching before you venture out; it will make you physically more able to prevent a fall.
     
  • Carry a small bag of salt, sand or kitty litter in your pocket or purse to sprinkle in front of you for traction on icy paths.
     
  • Avoid walking on surfaces that may be icy if you can. If you can't, slow down, shorten your stride, walk with feet pointed out slightly and knees gently bent to improve traction and balance. 
     
  • Snow can hide curbs and uneven surfaces. If you can't see where your foot will land, find another way.
     
  • Replace worn rubber tips on canes, walkers and crutches. Ask a mobility equipment dealer about winter canes or cleats you can add to existing equipment.
     
  • Dry off shoes, canes, crutches and walkers as soon as you get indoors. Wet shoes on dry surfaces are just as dangerous as dry shoes on wet surfaces.
     
  • If you are going out alone, carry a cell phone; know who you will call if you fall, and make sure that person knows what to do if you call.
     
  • Drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration, which can affect your balance as well as how your body responds to medication.
     
  • Ask your doctor or physical therapist about indoor exercises that can help you maintain strength and balance when you can't venture out.
     
  • Wear sunglasses to reduce glare from the sun and snow and ensure that you can see where you are walking.
     
  • Carry a cleaning cloth and stop immediately to clean your glasses if they fog up going from outdoors to indoors.
     
  • Ask your post office, newspaper and garbage collector about service options that might make it safer for you when conditions are bad.
     
  • When in doubt, don't risk it. Ask for help if you don't feel safe doing something.

 

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person's situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.
The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement. If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

Senior Citizen Jokes

By Janet Fickle

rockandroll_small_largeGeorge and Edith had been high school sweethearts 50 years ago, but had gone their separate ways after graduation. Then, two years ago, their paths crossed again, and they began seeing each other regularly. With age 70 just around the corner, they decided life was too short, and they might as well spend the rest of their lives together.  Excited about their decision to marry, they went for a stroll to discuss the wedding, and found themselves in front of a drugstore. George said, "Let’s go in. I have an idea."

Addressing the man behind the counter, George asked, "Are you the owner?" The pharmacist answered, "Yes sir, I am. How can I help you?"
George: "Do you sell heart medications?"
Pharmacist: "Of course."

George: "How about support hose?"
Pharmacist: "Definitely."

George: "What about medications for rheumatism, osteoporosis and arthritis?"
Pharmacist: "All kinds."

George: "How about waterproof furniture pads and Depends?"
Pharmacist: "Yes, sir."

George: "Hearing aids, denture supplies and reading glasses?"
Pharmacist: "Yes."

George: "What about eye drops, sleeping pills, Geritol, Preparation-H and Ex-Lax?"
Pharmacist: "Absolutely."

George: "You sell wheelchairs, walkers and canes?"
Pharmacist: "Yes, indeed. But why all these questions?"

George smiled, glanced shyly at Edith and replied, "We’ve decided to get
married and we’re considering you for our bridal registry."
Source: JokesQuote.Com

George and Edith are taking care of some of their special needs for their new life, but with new or second spouses at this age, there are usually two extended families involved.  It is so important to get every detail of your personal and financial planning taken care of immediately after marriage. Cooper, Adel & Associates are Certified Elder Law Attorneys who will be able to guide you and help you every step of the way with this important undertaking. Please call our 800-798-5297 to schedule a one hour free consultation in one of our four offices in Centerburg, Monroe, Sidney and/or Wilmington.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 

Shedding Pounds after 50

By Janet Fickle

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Losing weight is a goal for many people regardless of age. Older adults who are overweight are at risk of damaging their overall health. After 50 years of age, muscle mass tends to dwindle while body fat begins to increase. Men and women willing to make some changes with their diet and exercise can lose weight.

Changing your diet in small ways, such as eating more low calorie foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains will start you on the path to losing those unwanted pounds. Changing your eating habits isn’t easy, but once you start eating healthy, the benefits will soon become apparent.

Of course not only should we eat more healthy foods and less of the unhealthy foods, we should begin some type of exercise routine. After consulting with your health professional about the type of exercise

that is appropriate for you, begin regular physical activity. This helps muscles grow stronger increasing the chance of preventing a number of ailments such as heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults need at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate -intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, every week. Muscle strengthening activities include lifting weight, working out with resistance bands, push-ups and sit-ups that use body weight for resistance and Yoga. Gardening is considered a muscle strengthening activity.

Some dietary changes and routine exercise is all it takes to shed weight after 50 and keep the weight off once it’s gone. Obviously it takes some effort on our part, but it can be done.

Take one day at a time and begin a regimen that will gradually give you the ability to shed those unwanted pounds and begin a healthier life.

Source: Mt. Vernon News – Wrinkles & Laugh Lines.

While protecting your health and well-being is one of the more important things you can do, protecting your financial well-being is also very important. Come in to the offices of Cooper, Adel & Associates for a free consultation regarding estate planning, avoiding probate, protecting your families finances. Call to schedule a free consultation at one of our four office locations in Centerburg, Monroe, Sidney or wilmington.

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DISCLAIMER – Every case is different because every case is different. This blog does not give legal advice. This blog does not create an attorney client relationship. You are not permitted to rely on anything in this blog for any reason. This blog is an entirely personal endeavor. Every person’s situation is different and requires an attorney to review the situation personally with you.
No attorney-client relationship is created by this site.

The use of the Internet, this blog or email for communication with this firm or any individual member of this firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Before we represent any client, the client and the attorney will sign a written retainer agreement.
If you do not have a written, signed retainer agreement with us, we are not representing you and will not be taking any action on your behalf.

 



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